Call Us on +44 (0)1444 247766 or Email info@domtom.co.uk
....inspire... enthuse... support

Non Fiction.

Choose a book from our selection below

Medieval Villages Pt 1

Medieval Villages in the Eastern High Weald 1250 – 1750 PT 1: The Villages explained
by David and Barbara Martin, Christopher Whittick with Mark Gardiner and Jane Briscoe

Unlike the rest of England, where new villages were rarely formed after 1200, in the Weald of Kent and Sussex there is no clear evidence for the presence of any village before that date, and even then they were scarce until modern times. Otherwise, except for the coastal port towns, most houses in the area stood in isolation or, at best, in tiny clusters. The success of the villages which did develop was closely tied to their position on highways, allowing them to draw traders from their economic hinterland to serve their neighbouring communities. Even though the impulse towards market growth had lost its force by the fifteenth century, the size and prosperity of the Wealden villages did not decline because they also developed as centres of craft-production. This prosperity still manifests itself in the quality and extraordinarily high survival of medieval houses in the villages of the High Weald of Kent and Sussex.

Printed Version £24.99 plus p&p

Medieval Villages Pt 2

Medieval Villages in the Eastern High Weald 1250 – 1750 PT 2: The Houses Described
by David and Barbara Martin, Christopher Whittick with Mark Gardiner and Jane Briscoe

Unlike the rest of England, where new villages were rarely formed after 1200, in the Weald of Kent and Sussex there is no clear evidence for the presence of any village before that date, and even then they were scarce until modern times. Otherwise, except for the coastal port towns, most houses in the area stood in isolation or, at best, in tiny clusters. The success of the villages which did develop was closely tied to their position on highways, allowing them to draw traders from their economic hinterland to serve their neighbouring communities. Even though the impulse towards market growth had lost its force by the fifteenth century, the size and prosperity of the Wealden villages did not decline because they also developed as centres of craft-production. This prosperity still manifests itself in the quality and extraordinarily high survival of medieval houses in the villages of the High Weald of Kent and Sussex.

Printed Version £29.99 plus p&p

lady_rose_hickman

Lady Rose Hickman – Her Life and Family by Sue Allan

Lady Rose Hickman lived at Gainsborough Old Hall from 1596 until her death in 1613. In 1610, at the age of eighty- four, Rose wrote an account of some of the events in her life. She was born Rose Locke, in the City of London on December 27th2 1526. During her lifetime, she lived through the reigns of two Tudor kings and nine Tudor queens and into that of King James Stuart.

Printed Version £9.50 plus p&p

scrooby_manor

In Search of Scrooby Manor by Sue Allan

Not for over a hundred years has anyone studied the history of Scrooby Manor with such care as Sue Allan now presents in her new book.
Re-examining manuscripts and adding many previously unknown, she has built up a documentary basis for interpreting the remains of what was once a magnificent structure of more than thirty rooms, including a chapel now recognised as part of the existing house.

Through Sue’s tireless research we are enabled to imagine this grand manor of the Archbishops’ of York, where William Brewster, the leading layman of the Pilgrims grew up and where the Pilgrims came together in secret as they attempted to create a true church, yet found themselves forced to plan their escape from England to Holland. In 1620 they would go further to found the first English colony in New England.

Printed Version £14.99 plus p&p

bawtry chapel

James Brewster, Bawtry Chapel by Sue Allan

The revered name of William Brewster takes centre stage in the story of the Mayflower Pilgrims. Many Americans proudly trace their descent from this great man and yet very few know the name of his clergyman brother James, the Brewster who stayed behind in England.

In 1584, Archbishop Sandys appointed the Cambridge educated James Brewster to the position of Master of the Hospital Chapel of Mary Magdalene near Bawtry. Within a few short years Sandys would be dead and Brewster would be embroiled in a bitter court case accused for his part in misappropriating this Church property for his own enrichment. Historians would label James as a would-be thief and quarrelsome drunkard thus casting a stain upon his character for centuries to come.

Therefore on the scant occasions when mention is made that William Brewster had a brother, it is only ever in passing and never at length, lest the deeds of the one taint the other. And yet was James Brewster deserving of his sordid reputation?

In this book Sue Allan tells the reader more about James Brewster’s life and more importantly about the political and religious backdrop against which the Hospital Chapel affair ran its course. The author trusts that readers will come to their own conclusion as to the truth of the matter and the character of the man.

Printed Version £14.99 plus p&p

The Making of a Pilgrim

William Brewster – The Making of a Pilgrim by Sue Allan

Author and historian Sue Allan has extensively researched Brewster’s early years in Scrooby and elsewhere in England, and here presents an original and insightful view of how he developed into the man who would spiritually lead and nurture the congregation at Plymouth Colony.

In order to understand Brewster, the man, it is necessary to study the life and times within which he developed as a youth. A study of his family – his father, mother, grandparents, and siblings – provides the foundation.

At the conclusion, the reader of this book will have a much greater sense of who Pilgrim William Brewster was, and how he developed and later influenced the Mayflower Pilgrims and their church.

Printed Version £14.99 plus p&p

gainsborough_old_hall

Gainsborough Old Hall by Sue Allan

A Guide to Gainsborough Old Hall – Almost hidden in the north-west corner of Lincolnshire, magnificent Gainsborough Old Hall is one of the most impressive and best preserved medieval manor houses in England.

With muted reds of warm Tudor brickwork set against romantic black and white timber framing, this grand old Lady of Gainsborough has stood over watch over the town and the River Trent for more than five centuries.

Printed Version £14.99 plus p&p

steps along the mayflower trail

Steps Along The Mayflower Trail

Steps along the Mayflower Trail is not intended to be a book about the Mayflower Pilgrims – or Separatists, as they were known before the voyage to America.

Instead, this book has been written as a reference companion for those who are already familiar with the Separatists saga – but who are perhaps not so familiar with the places that feature in it.

Steps along the Mayflower Trail, sets out to illuminate those villages, towns and buildings in the three counties of Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, that played major roles in their odyssey. These are places that many of the Separatists would have once known as home.

Printed Version £11.99 plus p&p

the alien

The Alien by William Davis

The Alien is the extraordinary life story of an immigrant who arrived in Britain at sixteen speaking little English and became well-known as a media personality, entrepreneur, and the nation’s tourism supremo.

Born Gunter Keese in Hitler’s Germany, he changed his name to William Davis and adopted British citizenship. Lord Beaverbrook made him City Editor of the Evening Standard at 25 and he went on to become financial editor of The Guardian and a regular broadcaster presenting the Money Programme on TV and the World at One on radio.

But what really astonished the Establishment was his appointment as editor of Punch at a time when it was still world famous as a ‘uniquely British institution’. How could they have chosen a German? Private Eye dubbed him ‘Kaiser Bill’, a label that stuck throughout his nine successful years in the job. Bill also founded the award-winning magazine High Life, and in the early 1990’s was chairman of the British Tourist Authority and the English Tourist Board.

His frank and entertaining autobiography gives a fascinating insight into the challenges faced by an immigrant and offers witty, iconoclastic observations on British attitudes today. It is a compelling read for friend and foe alike.

Printed Version £7.99 plus p&p
Amazon Kindle Download Version: £2.89

caviar dogs

Caviar Dogs by William Davis

The essential guide to heavy petting

This highly entertaining book looks at the world of pampered pooches and the canine-human relationship.

Written with insight and humour, it is a treat for dog-lovers and a splendid gift for friends and others who share their view that our furry companions deserve the best that money can buy.

Printed Version £7.99 plus p&p
Amazon Kindle Download Version: £2.89

how to be british

How To Be British by William Davis

This is an essential guide for anyone who seeks to become a British citizen, and an entertaining read for those of us who already have that privilege but are no longer sure what is meant by Britishness.

Newcomers are expected to swear that they will be loyal and fulfil their ‘duties and obligations’ as citizens. ‘How to be British’ not only explains what these are but also reveals the many hidden rules of behaviour.

The author is an immigrant who came to Britain at sixteen speaking little English and became well-known as the financial editor of leading newspapers, broadcaster, editor of Punch, founder of the British Airways inflight magazine, and the nation’s tourism supremo. You will enjoy his witty and provocative observations and there is also a great deal of practical advice.

Printed Version £7.99 plus p&p
Amazon Kindle Download Version: £2.89

kairaba

Kairaba by Dawda K Jawara
The autobiography of Sir Dawda Kairaba Jawara

In this moving account the author, widely known for his tolerance, respect for democracy and the rule of law, bares his heart on the struggle for independence of The Gambia, the establishment of the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights in The Gambia, the 1981 coup, the Senegambia confederation, the 1994 coup and life in exile in the UK.

Printed Version £9.99 plus p&p

jesus_10_questions

Jesus: 10 Questions by David Stone

Ten Questions sets out to offer a way of interpreting Jesus and his mission in the light of today’s knowledge, attitudes and viewpoints, and calls for a new revelation. This is ‘the sort of book that can be picked up when the moment offers’ It is not academic theology, and David Stone co-opts some very unexpected witnesses to help make his case.

Printed Version £6.50 plus p&p

poems_to_pass_the_time

Poems to Pass the Time by Henri George

The book is a compilation of different poems which the author has written over the past years.

The poems are of either of a humorous or factual nature which will inspire the hearts of many and to help others see what life can be in a slightly serious but satirical way.

Printed Version £4.99 plus p&p

Rye Rebuilt

Rye Rebuilt by David & Barbara Martin with Jane Clubb & Gillian Draper

This is one of two volumes arising from an integrated research project co-ordinated and managed by the Romney Marsh Research Trust. The Trust exists to promote, co-ordinate and disseminate research into the historical, social, economic and physical development of Romney and Walland Marshes and their immediate hinterlands.

Now land-locked, lying two miles from the sea, throughout the medieval period Rye fulfilled a significant role as a seaport, in tandem with its much-larger sister town of Winchelsea. When Winchelsea collapsed, Rye experienced meteoric growth both in terms of population and prosperity. By the 16th century, it was a packed and bustling town, with a vibrant community, being home to one of the greatest concentrations of houses in south-east England. Fuelled by its prosperity and responding to pressures of population, it was during this period that many of the houses in Rye were rebuilt. However, regeneration was short-lived, followed by drawn-out decline, extending through the 17th century.

This volume is a study of the town’s built heritage, placed within its historical context.

Printed Version – Price £29.99 plus p&p

Hastings Old Town

Hastings Old Town by David & Barbara Martin, Christopher Whittick with Jane Briscoe

In historical times the relative success of one town over its neighbours depended upon more than the strength and wealth of its hinterland. Because of its strong castle and a harbour offering the shortest crossing to Normandy, the 11th and early 12th centuries ensured Hastings was the principal port in East Sussex. Coastal erosion subsequently robbed it of these advantages and, as a result, it was able to survive only because of its fishery, which sustained but a poor and fluctuating level of affluence. Even so, there is good survival of 15th and 17th century houses, though very few which date from either the 16th or first half of the 18th centuries. It was not until the second quarter of the 19th century that the town found a new niche as a seaside resort, a role which once more allowed it to assert its dominance over the surrounding region.

Printed Version – Price £29.99 plus p&p

Building Battle

Building Battle Town by David & Barbara Martin, Christopher Whittick with Jane Briscoe

If any English town can be said to be a child of conquest it is Battle. Before 1066 this was a bare and desolate ridge of land. William, Duke of Normandy, built a great abbey here, on the site where King Harold fell, in order to commemorate his victory. The town was founded to serve the abbey. By c.1105 there were 109 houses and by 1367, despite the Black Death two decades earlier, the town had almost doubled to 207. Even so, by 1433 the total had fallen back to 156. The abbey’s dissolution in 1538 robbed Battle of its benefactor and challenged its survival as never before. Yet it still had 124 households in 1569, a total which rose modestly to 134 by 1730. It is against this backdrop that Battle’s rich surviving domestic architecture needs to be judged. This volume is a study of that heritage, placed within its historical context.

Printed Version – Price £29.99 plus p&p

Back to Top